Cats are twice as likely to survive a venomous snakebite than dogs, and the reasons behind this phenomenon have been revealed by University of Queensland research.

The research team, led by PhD student Christina Zdenek and Associate Professor Bryan Fry, compared the effects of snake venoms on the blood clotting agents in dogs and cats, hoping to help save the lives of our furry friends.

“Snakebite are a common occurrence for pet cats and dogs across the globe and can be fatal,” Dr Fry said.

He continued “This is primarily due to a condition called ‘venom-induced consumptive coagulopathy’ – where an animal loses its ability to clot blood and sadly bleeds to death. In Australia, the eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis) alone is responsible for an estimated 76 per cent of reported domestic pet snakebites each year. And while only 31 per cent of dogs survive being…

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